Modelling Icon – Mehelli B. Dinshaw

Mehelli Dinshaw is the  Managing Director of Dinshaw & Company, established in 1883. The company did Stevedoring and Cargo Handling in Karachi Port. An engineer, a wizard in ports and shipping and for three years, was advisor member of the Board of Ports and Shipping, Pakistan.  

Mehelli was attracted to aero-modelling from age 12 and to-date must have made nearly a hundred different models not just of aircraft but some of cars, and ships too.  His sons Behram and Eddie were also drawn in by his passion, of whom Eddie, is a proficient flyer, having taken 2nd place in a senior aerobatic competition. (Kaizer and Mehelli also have a daughter Vera, who with a friend, has created ‘Parsis Exchange Recipes (PER)’ page on Facebook, which today has more than 9,000 members.)

He is a Grammarian who after Inter-science studied Flour Milling Technology through the City & Guilds of London and worked at the Karachi Steam Roller Flour Mills, but in 1966 due to sudden demise of his father he joined his family firm of Dinshaw & Company, who were stevedores and cargo handlers at the Karachi port.  Mehelli was more drawn to cargo handling and in 1982 secured the cargo handling contract becoming the first person to operate the newly built Port Qasim.  In 2002 the Ministry of Communication invited him to be an advisor member on the Board of Port and Shipping where he served for 3 years. He was also member and later vice-president of the Karachi Stevedore conference for 10 years.  He is also a professional life member of the Chartered Institute of Logistics & Transport, London.

Between 2008 and 2011 his Belgian and UK principals who he represented in Pakistan, secured the contract to build the newly started FAP Grain & Fertilizer Terminal at Port Qasim and he was fully involved in its conceptual design and equipment supply.

His first aircraft model was around 1955 with simple balsa wood and tissue from Keil Kraft and Veron kits. The handicraft teacher at the school encouraged him and he made a 30-inch Clipper sailing ship the “Cutty Sark”, from scratch, complete with standing and running rigging, “which got me first prize in the school exhibition,” he recalls with a smile. By the time he was in college he had made quite a few planes, free-flight, gliders and control line, all from English kits available in Karachi from one and only famous model shop the “Skylines”.

Besides aeromodelling he also was an avid Meccano builder and had sets Nos. 8 and 10 with motors and gear-boxes, and regularly bought the monthly Meccano magazine.

Till the early 1970’s there was no aero modeling club in Karachi but young and old Parsis met at the house of Russi Mobed whom Mehelli calls the “father of aeromodelling in Karachi”. They would regularly go flying their models at the Polo Ground or at the Clifton Crossing area and Russi Mobed who worked with BOAC sometimes even took them with British pilots and officers to the PAF airfield.

Habib M. Habib used to also join in and became a very fast and personal friend, a great friendship that lasted for over 50 years till he sadly expired in 2013.   Once a month Habib arranged a “D & M” (dinner & movies) for a few senior fliers and after dinner they saw WW2 war movies with aviation themes.  In his obituary on FaceBook Mehelli wrote “…… Rest in peace my friend and one day we will meet in the happy hunting grounds and fly again together..…”

Of the aeromodelling categories free-flight predominated in the early days of 1950’s and 60’s, with diesel engines and Jetex motors.  Radio Control (R/c) models were in infancy and there was no one to teach how to fly with R/c.  “I remember having single flights every Sunday, coming home with a damaged plane, repairing it and again flying the next Sunday to crash it once again!!  Finally, and gradually I got the hang of it, and when I came home with an intact plane, I was happy!!” After that there was no limit to the types of models he made and flew.

By the late 1970’s there were a lot of fliers from Karachi and R/C dominated the scene. That was when H.M. Habib and Mehelli floated the idea of forming a club and MASK (Model Aeronautical Society of Karachi) was formed.  MASK members regularly flew every Sunday and gave a great boost to R/C flying and regular annual competition became the norm.  In 1975 MASK acquired a 9-acre plot in Korangi and it became their flying field.  A clubhouse was built with kitchen, toilets etc. and every Sunday members had breakfast there.

MASK even flew demonstration flights for the PAF on Air Force day, 7th September at PAF’s Masroor Base.  “From the pioneering Parsi fliers, besides myself there was Fali Antia, Roy Patel, Shahpur Maneckji, Kairasp Daruwala, and the Dr Virjee brothers”.

Mehelli always loved large radio-controlled sailplanes (soaring gliders) and in 1985 brought from UK a kit for 4-meter sailplane, the “Wildflecken”, which easily won all the R/c glider competitions in MASK and because of it, the members of MASK gave him the nickname Mehelli “Birdman” Dinshaw!!  The Wildflecken was flown regularly till 2016, and finally was given to a friend who today still flies it in Islamabad, still in immaculate condition after 40 years.

He also flew R/c aerobatic aircrafts and with his Supra-Fly took 2nd position in MASK’s 1992 aerobatic competition. The SupraFly had a wing span of over 6 feet, weighed 6 lbs, and had a 10 c.c. engine with a 12 in. propeller.  It was the best aerobatic plane flown by Mehelli.

He also placed 2nd and 3rd many times in other years, as well as placed 1st, 2nd and 3rd, many times in free-flight gliders, power-, rubber-powered, and control line, balloon burst and team racing.

Mehelli has indulged in this hobby fully flying every type of free flight model to all types of R/c powered planes.  The only ones he has not touched – and will now not be able to due to bad eyesight – are fast jets and 3D flying.  “But I have no regrets as I can still fly the slow electric models and gliders. In fact, every Sunday see the other types flown by our MASK members at our excellent nine acre flying field in Karachi.”  However he continues to fly on computer simulators at home.

“I have played a long innings from 1955 and have enjoyed every second spent in aeromodelling.  Today at the age of 79 I can look back with happiness and gratefulness for all the excellent friends I have made due to the hobby.  I still have a few of my old free flight power and rubber planes which I plan to now convert to electric.”

“To the aspiring aero-modelers I will say that R/c flying requires patience, dedication and initially a good tutor.  The learning curve takes a while to overcome, but regular flying week after week is necessary to solo successfully. After that the sky is the limit,” concludes the veteran aero-modeler.

Besides aeromodelling, Mehelli also indulges in making scale model aircraft, having made nearly 125 till today.  He started making them from the early 1960’s and continues till today.  He makes only military aircrafts of WW2, post WW2 and selected current jets of all air forces.  He loves Mitchel’s design the iconic Supermarine Spitfire and has made twelve Spitfires of different marks, from Mk.1 to Mk.47.  His other favorite plane is the Hawker Hunter, Sidney Camm’s beautiful design with its smooth flowing lines.

Now that he does not fly R/c anymore his concentration is on these scale models.  He is an active member of the SMAP (Scale modelers Association of Pakistan) where members share building and finishing technics etc.

Working daily for about 1 – 2 hours in the afternoons each model takes about 3 weeks, which is roughly 50 – 60 hours of work.  Each model requires a lot of research and study before making it. Today internet and YouTube provides unlimited information and guidance on making and finishing technics.  People think making plastic planes is adults playing with toys, but it’s not that.  It’s an art form that results from research and hard work to complete an accurate model representing the real one.

Making scale models is an absolute fantastic hobby and it is only for those with a passion for aviation. When working your mind is active and it’s a great relaxing hobby and a stress reliever from one’s daily routines. He regularly buys kits both on-line from UK and from the PAF museum shop and has a stash of over 15 new unmade kits.  He concludes saying, “I will now continue making scale models always”.


A devout aeromodeller and an Aeromodelling ICON in the true sense. Recently he was involved in setting up of the Grain and Fertilizer Terminal, The Fauji Akbar Portia Marine Terminals (Pvt) Limited at Port Qasim Karachi. 

I have the honour of interviewing Mehelli Dinshaw. A decent gentleman, incidentally was my first RC instructor way back in the 80s.

Regards

Flt Engr (R) Jamshed Ishrat


Following is the detailed Interview:

1. Tell us about yourself in general (outside of the hobby e.g. family, childhood, education, profession etc.).

I was born in Karachi in April 1942, and can still remember the turbulent days of 1947.  I studied in the Karachi Grammar School and passed my Senior Cambridge Exam in 1957, after which I did Inter Science in the D.J. Science College.  I then studied Flour Milling Technology through City & Guilds London, while simultaneously working in Karachi’s largest flour mill, the Karachi Steam Roller Flour Mills, starting as an apprentice working shifts and later as assistant manager.   In 1966 on the sudden demise of my father and I joined the family firm of Dinshaw & Company, doing Stevedoring and Cargo Handling in Karachi Port. I made my life in cargo handling in Karachi port and in 1982 I secured the cargo handing contract and became the first person to operate the newly built port of Port Qasim.  In 2002 Ministry of Communication invited me to be an advisor member of the Board of Ports and Shipping, which I occupied for 3 years.

I also represent a few foreign companies in Pakistan, specializing in ship unloading machinery and bulk storage silos.  Between 2008 and 2011 my principals secured the contract to build the newly started FAP Grain & Fertilizer Terminal at Port Qasim and I was fully involved in its conceptual design and equipment supply. 

2. What made you come into this hobby and when did you start? 

It was around 1955 when I was in class 8 in the Karachi Grammar School that I started making simple balsa and tissue covered models from Keil Kraft and Veron kits at the age of about 12 /13 years old.  Our handicraft teacher encouraged us but except for myself and Johnny Sadiq (well known PIA commander) no one else got into it.  I can remember making the Keil Kraft “Eaglet”, a 24 inch span rubber powered free flight model.  We used to display our models in the annual school art exhibition.  Together with planes I also made model ships and remember making a 30 inch long Clipper sailing ship the “Cutty Sark” from scratch complete with standing and running rigging, which got me first prize in the school exhibition. 

3. Was there an organized club at the time.

There was no club at that time but there were a few young and old from our Parsi community who regularly got together in the house of Rusi Mobed, the real father of aeromodelling in Karachi, and we regularly went flying at the Polo ground or at the Clifton Crossing area.  Mr. Mobed worked with BOAC that time, and we even went with British pilots and officers to the PAF airfield.  Habib M. Habib used to also join in.

4. What category of aeromodelling existed at the time and what was your favourite.

Free flight predominated, with diesel engines and Jetex motors.  Radio Control was in its infancy that time with single channel sets and escapements working rudder only.  By the time I was in college I had made quite a few planes, free flight powered, gliders, control line and rubber powered.  All were from English kits which were easily available from Karachi’s one and only famous model shop called “Skylines” run by Mr. Khandwalla.  He stocked everything from balsa, model kits, engines, Jetex motors and accessories.  Not having a lot of money those days free flight, Jetex and control line were my favorites.

5. Was there an inter club competition.

As I said there were no clubs but we Parsi aeromodeller’s just got together regularly to fly.  That was the time when our famous Habib M. Habib used to join in and being Gujrati speaking like us Parsis we all mixed very well. 

6. What do you enjoy the most in this hobby? Is it designing, building or flying? 

 I started initially with English Keil Kraft and Veron kits, and even made a few Gillows rubber powered scale models.  In 1969 I got my first R/c unit, an English McGregor 2 channel non-proportional set but I was not at all happy with it.  At that time only Habib had a 4-channel Kraft Proportional set.  Finally in about 1972 I got my first Futaba 3-channel proportional radio and my first R/c plane was a Kiel Kraft “Mini-Super”, a 48 inch span high winger with tricycle undercarriage.  Those days there was no one to teach us to fly R/c so it was all a trial & error show.  I remember having single flights every Sunday, coming home with a damaged plane, repairing it and again flying the next Sunday to crash it once again!!  Finally and gradually I got the hang of it, and when I came home with an intact plane I was happy!!

After that there was no limit to the types of models made and flown.  I used to buy about 5 magazines both English and American every month and from there plans service ordered a lot of good plans, and scratch built them.  Designed a few also, by altering the plans sometimes. I have used engines from 010 Cox to .60’s and still have a big collection of used and brand new engines at home.

7. Any interesting story that you want to share?

There are too many stories to tell, after all a modeling career of over 50 years can bring back a flood of memories.  Every Sunday was an interesting day and I always went back home with my 2 sons, Behram & Eddie, fully satisfied and happy.  Both my sons learnt to fly from the age of 10 years on a 3 channel Pilot BoxFly with a OS-25 motor.  I later made a new wing with ailerons to give then 4 channel experience, and they both were fast learners and graduated to aerobatic types very soon.  The eldest, Behram left to study in the USA in 1988 at the age of 18, but the second one, Eddie, became a proficient flyer and even took 2nd place in MASK’s Senior aerobatic competition in 1992. 

8. Are you a member of any other club in Pakistan or outside. If ‘yes’ tell us about its working, safety aspects etc.

I am a member only of MASK in Karachi which together with Karachi fliers we started about 1975 and operated so successfully till today.

9. How many aircraft have you bought/built? Walk us through these aircraft, their specs. and your experiences.

See the attached file called “My adventure into models from school days”.  I have tried to list the cars, ships, and various types of planes I have made and flown.  It is not a complete listing but I have put down accurately whatever I can remember

10. Which is your favorite aircraft and why?

I have always loved large R/c Sailplanes, and in 1975 I brought from UK a kit for a 4 meter sailplane called the “Wildflecken”.  Till today even after 37 years it is in perfect flying condition.  It has a G/F fuselage and fully built up and sheeted wings, and a flying tail.  I have launched it with winches, hi-starts, and a power-pod on top of the wing centre section with only a OS-15 motor in spite of its all up weight of 5 lbs, as the wing loading is only 7 – 8 ozs per Sq Foot. Due to its weight it flies magnificently even in windy conditions and penetrates very well.  I have had flight of up to 1 hour up to heights of 1,500 feet easily as its thermaling qualities are superb, and always came down after that as my neck started to pain by looking up continuously!!  I am currently upgrading it by fitting an electric motor power pod and hope to fly it this winter.  My “Wildflecken” easily won the glider competitions and because of it the members named me Mehelli “Birdman” Dinshaw!!

My other favourite powered plane was the “Supra-45 Unlimited, 65 inch span with an OS-61 FSR, and with retracts which I made in 1991.  My son, Eddie and I both flew this plane in our MASK competition in Karachi in 1992 and secured 2nd and 3rd position with Essa coming first.  It is still in excellent flying condition even after 20 years.

My other passion was Free-flight gliders of the A2 or F1B class.  I specialised in building all sheet wings with Jedelski section and successfully flew in our MASK free flight competitions from 1980 to about 1985 after which interest in free flight dropped in MASK.  I also loved Free flight rubber powered and built many.  Real F1B class Rubber powered is not just a loop of rubber you wind up.  These state of art planes are up to 50 inch span, with large 14 -16 inch hand made folding props and are powered by 16 – 18 strands of ¼ inch Pirelli rubber wound to over 1,000 turns giving a motor run of nearly one minute and a flight tiime of over 3 minutes.  Free flight is great but today ARF R/C dominates and no one has the interest or the time to really build these special planes from plans.  

11. Tell us about your positions in the past aeromodelling competitions.

As said above I took 2nd position in MASK’s 1992 aerobatic competition, and placed 2nd and 3rd. many times in other years.  In our MASK free flight competitions again placed 1st, 2nd and 3rd, many time in free flight gliders, power, rubber powered, and control line balloon burst and team racing. 

12. What are your other occupations?

Professionally I am an engineer and a shipping, stevedoring and cargo handling man for over 45 years being Executive Partner of my family firm of Dinshaw & Company which was established in the last century in 1883.  I am now semi-retired being 70 years old, and self employed as a consultant for cargo and port related projects and manage work of representing a few of my foreign Principals for supplying machinery and spare parts. 

13. What are your aspirations from this hobby?

I have indulged in this hobby fully flying every type of free flight model to all types of powered planes.  The only ones I have not touched and will now not be able to due to bad eyesight are jets and 3D flying.  But that is no problem and I have no regrets as I can still fly the slow electric and gliders and every Sunday see the other types flying with our MASK members at our excellent flying field in Karachi. 

14. An advice to aeromodelling clubs in Pakistan.

Encourage youngsters at high school and college level to take up R/C flying and help and teach them to fly.  With a good tutor an interested new comer will be up and flying with minimum damage to his trainer plane in 8 – 10 flights. 

15. If you are asked to give one suggestion to someone who is just starting aeromodelling what would that be?

R/c flying required dedication and initially regular flying with a good tutor.  The learning curve is easy to overcome but regular flying week after week is necessary to solo successfully. After that the sky is the limit. 

16. How do you manage your family expectations towards this hobby?

My family was always involved in flying.  Both my sons started flying at the age of 8 – 10 years, and my wife encouraged me and my sons to go out and fly every Sunday.  No problems at all. 

17. Any closing statement that you want to give?

I have played a long innings from 1955 and have enjoyed every second spent in aeromodelling.  Today at the age of 79 I can look back with happiness and gratefulness for all the excellent friends I have made due to the hobby.  My eyes today are giving a problem so I have stopped flying RC. I now concentrate on Static Scale models.  I still have a few of my old free flight power and rubber planes which I plan to now convert to electric.  I have already converted and flown one old Cox TeeDee 051 powered free flight very successfully with a 360 Mah LiPO battery and mini servos.  I look forward converting a few more for many more years of happy flying.


Adventures into models of planes, ships, cars, etc since school days

Boats, Ships & Cars

Powered by

Comments

Approx dates

Boats & Ships

Boat from plans of Hobbies Weekly magazine, about 15 in long

Electric Mighty Midget motor  and 3 x AA batteries

Used to run it in our KPI club swimming pool

1955 ?

Many small (max 6 – 8 in long) waterline scale models of galleons etc. with paper sails from balsa wood and painted

Exhibited in Grammar School exhibition

1957

“Cutty Sark” complete with standing and running rigging, about 40 in long.

Exhibited in Grammar School exhibition and finally presented to school 

1957

“Cutty Sark” from plastic kit – about 12 in. long

Cars

Tamiya “Porsche” electric 05 motor

RC with Futaba 4 Ch.

1979

Tamiya “Grasshopper’ Off-road racer

05 motor, 1300 mah Nicad’s 

Futaba 2-Ch.

1985

Associated Racer

05 motor, 1300 Mah NiCads

Futaba-2 Ch.

1990

Free Flight – Jetex-50b

ARF Jetex

Jetex 50b powered

Bought from “Sky Lines” – Flew very well

1957

Keil Kraft “Attacker”

Jetex 50b powered

Bought from “Sky Lines”

1958 – 59

Keil Kraft “D.H.Veron”

Jetex 50b powered

Bought from “Sky Lines”

1958 – 59

Various/misc. all sheet from Aeromodeller magazine plans

Jetex 50b powered

All flew well

1957 -60

Chuck Gliders or HLG (Hand Launch Gliders)

Plenty made, best being Sniffer’s, Thermal Sniffers, Heat-wave, Sailaway, Sweepette, Thermic 12 – 14 in.span, plenty of Lunch-box’s etc. 

1980’s

HLG drawn from Free Flight News (FFn) plans, 22 inch span with laminated sheet wing & GRF boom

Flown by me in MASK F/F Comp

1982 – 84

“Zweibox” drawn up from magazine plans. 16’ span with GRF boom

Flown by me in MASK F/F Comp

1982 – 84

3/4 size “Zweibox’s” – smaller lighter versions for sons Behram & Eddie to manage

Flown by Behram & Eddie in MASK F/F Comp

Free Flight Tow line Launch Gliders

Keil Kraft “Cub” Glider, 24 in span

Free flight

Bought from “Sky Lines”

1958

A-1 Jedelski wing glider, plans drawn/copied from magazine of Graupner “Starstream” design and named it “Butterfly”

With timer dethermaliser

Flown by Behram & Eddie in MASK F/F Comp

1982 – 84

A-2’s or F1A’s (2 made) with Jedelski wings

With timer dethermaliser

Flown in MASK F/F Comp

1982 – 84

Own design 40 inch span Jedelski wing glider from own drawn design called “Bayloo” and flown by sons Behram & Eddie

Flown in MASK F/F Comp

1982 – 84

Free Flight Rubber 

Keil Kraft “Hawker Hurricane”, 18 in span, 

Rubber powered.

Bought from “Sky Lines”

1958 – 59

Keil Kraft “Eaglet” 24 in span

Rubber powered

Bought from “Sky Lines”

1958 – 59

Keil Kraft “Senator”, 32 in span

Rubber powered-8 strands ¼ inch rubber

Flown in MASK F/F Comp

1982 – 84

Keil Kraft “Gipsy”, 40 in span

Rubber powered– 12 strands ¼ inch FAI rubber

Flown in MASK F/F Comp

1982 – 84

“Predator” an open class 50 inch span rubber powered from Aeromodeller plans

Rubber powered – 18 strands ¼ inch FAI rubber

Flown in MASK F/F Comp

1982 – 84

“Bo-Jess” Open class from plans

Rubber powered

Not flown

1982 – 84

Free Flight Power

Drawn from plan in US magazine

Cox .22 Pee Wee

Flown in MASK F/F Comp by Behram & Eddie

1982 – 84

From RCM plan “1/2A Witch Hawk”

Cox .Tee Dee 051 (red body) powered

Flown in MASK F/F Comp

1982 -84

From RCM Plans 55 Inch span Open class power F1C.  GRP boom, built up wing & V-tail for Rossi-15

OS-15 powered

Not Flown Flown in MASK F/F Comp

1982 -84

Control Line

From plans for Albion 1.5 cc diesel motor

1960

C/Line trainer with OS-10 and later used as balloon burst and team racer training with OS-15

OS-10 & 15 powered

Good flier and good results in MASK comps.

Made about 1970, and used in MASK Comps in 1982 – 84 

2 Team racers drawn from US magazine article. One flown by me and the other made for Roy Patel 

Cox TeeDee.049 (black body) & .051 (red body)

Flown in MASK F/F Comp

1982 -84

Radio Control Planes

Keil Kraft “Mini Super” 48 inch span.  My first R/C plane

OS-19 RC

Futaba-3 Ch

1971

M.K. “Star”

Enya-19 RC

Futaba-3 Ch and Heathkit – 4 Ch. Single stick

1972

(1) Keil Kraft “Super – 60”

Enya-29 TV

Futaba-4

1971

(2) Keil Kraft “Super – 60”

Enya-45 TV

Futaba-6

1973

Pilot “Olympia”, ARF Glider with power pod

OS-15 RC

Skyleada-4 Ch

1974

Pilot “Thermal Glider” ARF with Enya-09 TV on pod

Enya-09 TV

Kraft-2 Brick

1974

RCM “Joy Stick” from RCM plans 

Cox Tee Dee .049

Heathkit-4 Ch single stick

1976

RCM “Joy Stick” RCM “Joy Stick” from RCM plans

Cox Tee Dee .051

Futaba–6 Ch

1976

RCM “Joy Stick” from RCM plans – made for Roy

Cox Tee Dee .049

1976

RCM “Dartcart” from RCM plan given by Habib

Enya-45 TV

Futaba-6 Ch

1976

RCM 1/2A “Kaos” with foam wings

OS-10 RC

Cannon-4 Ch, mini radio from Habib

1977

Radio Sailplanes “Wildflecken” 144 inch span sailplane. GRF fuselage and built up wings and flying elevators – bought in UK in 1976 from Henry J. Nicholls, London

OS-15 on pod over wing

Futaba-4 Ch.

1977 -80

MFA “Hummingbird”, 05 electric motor & NiCads

05 motor

Cannon–4 Ch.

M.K. “Shooting Star” with retracts – crashed by Ayaz in PAF base 

OS-40 FSR

Futaba-6 Ch.

1979

Pilot “Tristar” ARF 

OS-15 RC

Futaba-6 Ch.

Delta “Draken” plans drawn from article in RM magazine.

OS-40 RC

Futaba-6 Ch.

Pilot “Das Box Fly” Excellent 3 Channel trainer used to teach sons Behram & Eddie.  Later fitted with aileron wing to teach 4 channel.

Enya-19 TV, OS-20 RC & OS-25 RC.

Various Futaba’s 4 Ch & 6 Ch.

1980, flown till about 1993, also in MASK Fun Fly Comps.  Finally sold in 1998 after 18 years of flying.

“Antares” Scratch built from RM plans.

OS 40FSR Enya 49 TV

Futaba’s 4 Ch & 6 Ch.

1981 and finally sold in 2010

“Wanderer” RC glider from RCM plans with wings extended 2 bays.

Futaba-6 Ch.

1986 Flown by Behram & Eddie in MASK competitions

“Phoenix” glider, 100 in blue foam wings and all flying elevator

Futaba-6 Ch.

1884 – still in excellent flying condition today

Pilot “QB-20 – 4 Channel

Futaba-6 Ch

1980 – sold in 2010

Piper”Cheroke” ARF given by Habib.

OS-40 RC

Futaba-4 Ch

1980 – 87

Kaos-40

OS-40 RC

Futaba-6 Ch

1982

Avicraft “Panic” biplane

OS-60 FSR

Sold to Jamshed Ishrat

(1) Supra-45 Unlimited

OS-60 FSR

Futaba-6 Ch

1988 – Destroyed in mid-air collision with Tariq in 1991 – while Eddie flying 

(1) EZ “Reno” Racer

OS-32 FSR

Futaba-6 Ch

1989

(1) EZ “Reno” Racer

OS-32 FSR

Futaba-6 Ch

1991

(2) Supra-45 Unlimited

OS-60 FSR

Futaba-6 Ch

1991

“Silky Wings” All red electric for 400 electric motor given by Habib. My first real good flying electric.

400 electric motor with 600 Mah Nicads now with 1000 Mah LiPo

Futaba 6 Ch.

2003

OK Pilot “Cardamon” 56 in. span ARF electric sailplane from Singapore Hobbies

Geared 180 motor and NiMH batteries now with 850 Mah LiPo

Futaba 6 Ch

2008

World Models “Thermal Sailor” – 100 inch electric powered sailplane

Geared 05 motor with 2100 Mah LiPo battery

Futaba 6 Ch

2008

My old F/F “Witch Wawk” for TeeDee 051converted to electric 

1000 Mah LiPO and mini servoes

Futaba 6 Ch

2010

“Wildflecken” of 1977 vintage revamped to electric motor on pod and 2100 Mah LiPo

Futaba 6 Ch

2011

Plastic Scale Models

A huge number of planes of 1/72 scale of WW-1 and WW-2 and modern jets.  A few 1/48 and one 1/32 Spitfire Mk-5

50 – 60 models displayed at home. Also have about 10 unmade kits yet to make

From 1960 to today

R/C Helicopters & Quadrocopters

GMC “Cricket”, 4 Ch. without cyclic.  Never flown and sold

OS-32 RC

Futaba 4 Ch

1985

Various mini 2 & 3 Ch. Electric Heli’s with twin contra-rotation rotors

Electric with LiPO batteries

Supplied Tx’s

2008 – 2010

 

Quadrocopter

 

 

2013

 

NANO QX Mini Qadrocopter brought by Sohrab from Dubai

 

 

2015


Following are the pictorial memories of Mehelli B. Dinshaw over the years


Following are the static models made by Mehelli B. Dinshaw in last 3 years.

 

Keep visiting Model Aircraft News.

If you have any comments or words to say you can write them in comments section below this post….

Share with

0 Replies

Write a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.